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Passive or Active Grounding? - that is the Question

Passive or Active Grounding - that is the Question?
For years now simple passive grounding has been used throughout industry as a low-cost safety measure and protection against fires and explosions caused by static electricity but is it as safe as you think?
Passive or Active Grounding - that is the Question?

In many branches of industry, hazardous atmospheres exist due to the presence of flammable liquid vapours, gases, dust and fibres. No matter how the explosive atmosphere is classified, all potential ignition sources must be eliminated, with static electricity being perhaps the most insidious of them all.

Electrostatic charges can accumulate on tank trucks, vacuum trucks, interconnection plant assemblies, metal containers such as drums and hazardous area suitable Ex IBCs. Once the handling operations begin, these metal containers can quickly generate enough voltage for an electrostatic discharge to occur resulting in potential ignitions of Ex atmospheres.

  • Passive Grounding users are unable to confirm a good earth connection prior to and during process operations.
  • Active Grounding – high intensity flashing green LEDs confirms to users of a safe working environment and reassurance that the equipment is grounded and monitored to a resistance of < 10 Ω.

For over 40 years, Newson Gale has been leading the way in hazardous area static grounding control, serving many industries globally where processes generating static electricity have the potential to ignite flammable or combustible atmospheres. To help control these risks, Newson Gale offers a wide range of static grounding and bonding equipment designed to provide optimum safety in explosive atmospheres.

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Newson Gale, a HOERBIGER Safety Solutions Company, enjoys an outstanding market position in electrostatic grounding for hazardous areas. Headquartered in Nottingham, United Kingdom, the company is represented in over 50 countries around the globe. Newson...

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